Remembering the fallen

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#181

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

Bottom post of the previous page:

Former Peugeot WRC boss Corrado Provera dies aged 82
Corrado Provera, the former head of Peugeot Sport who led the French brand to success in the World Rally Championship, has died aged 82.

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The Italian started his career as a journalist prior to a spell working in public relations, but he is perhaps best known in motorsport for managing Peugeot’s return to the WRC in 1999.

Provera initially worked for Chrysler Italy, progressing his way up through the ranks at the manufacturer before it was bought by Peugeot.

After being named head of Peugeot Sport, he led the marque back to the WRC, where it had previously enjoyed success in the Group B era, winning back-to-back titles in 1985-1986.

Under Provera’s leadership, Peugeot won 27 WRC rallies from 1999-2005 with 24 of those delivered by the impressive 206 WRC before the brand introduced the 307 WRC from 2004.

These victories helped Peugeot to three consecutive manufacturers titles from 2000-2002 and two drivers’ titles claimed by Finland’s Marcus Gronholm.

Provera retired from the role after Rally Sweden in 2005 handing the reins of the Peugeot Sport team over to Jean-Pierre Nicolas, ahead of the car maker withdrawing from the WRC at the end of the season.

While Provera enjoyed success in WRC, he played a key role in Peugeot’s Formula 1 engine programme from 1994.

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Rally winner and 2002 World Rally Champion Marcus Gronholm (FIN) / Timo Rautiainen (FIN) Peugeot 206 WRC

The firm initially supplied engines to McLaren before switching to Jordan and latterly the Prost Grand Prix squad, before Peugeot pulled the plug on its programme after 115 grands prix in favour of a factory WRC programme.
https://www.autosport.com/wrc/news/form ... /10543452/

Peugeot Sport:
“It is with great regret that we learn of the passing of Corrado Provera,” read a statement from Peugeot Sport. “His years at the head of Peugeot Sport were marked by his charisma and energy. We send our sincere condolences to his family and all those who knew him.”
FIA President Mohammed Ben Sulayem: “Deeply saddened to hear of the passing of the former head of the Peugeot World Rally Championship programme Corrado Provera. On behalf of the FIA, we extend our sincere condolences to his family and friends.”


RIP Corrado Provera. :rip: :tearful:

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#182

Post by erwin greven »

Brian Redman: "Mr. Fangio, how do you come so fast?" "More throttle, less brakes...."
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#183

Post by erwin greven »

Brian Redman: "Mr. Fangio, how do you come so fast?" "More throttle, less brakes...."
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#184

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

RIP René Metge

Sad it should happen on the eve of the start of this year's Dakar. Not that the current Dakar guise is anything like the iconic event Dakar used to be when he was competing in the event.

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#185

Post by erwin greven »

Porsche mourns the loss of Herbert Linge
Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG is mourning the loss of the former racing driver and Operations Manager of the Weissach Development Centre, Herbert Linge, who died on 5 January 2024 aged 95. Linge played an instrumental role in setting up Porsche’s proving ground, while through his work with motorsport’s governing body he was responsible for the introduction of life-saving measures at racing tracks around the world.
Brian Redman: "Mr. Fangio, how do you come so fast?" "More throttle, less brakes...."
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#186

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

erwin greven wrote: 6 months ago Porsche mourns the loss of Herbert Linge
Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG is mourning the loss of the former racing driver and Operations Manager of the Weissach Development Centre, Herbert Linge, who died on 5 January 2024 aged 95. Linge played an instrumental role in setting up Porsche’s proving ground, while through his work with motorsport’s governing body he was responsible for the introduction of life-saving measures at racing tracks around the world.
Just to say Linge was reasonably successful both as a driver in rallying and racing plus away from driving in retirement

He raced at Le Mans 15 times and, during his 20 years of racing, took 90 class victories and six international records. In 1957 he took a class win at the Mille Miglia, a class win in the Sebring 12 hour race in 1958 and the GT class victory at the Targa Florio in 1963. In 1972 he founded the Deutscher Motor Sport Bund's DMSB-Staffel, the first mobile track marshalling crew.


RIP Herbert Linge :rip: :tearful:

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#187

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

A fuller biog for Linge (from15 years ago I have to add) I found on HistoricRacing.com
Herbert Linge was born in Weissach. A works driver and production manager at Porsche AG, Stuttgart, Linge achieved many successes during his 20 years of racing. His impressive list of successes includes 90 class victories and six international records. He contested the Le Mans 24 hour race 15 times, won the Liège-Rome-Liège race in 1954 and in 1957 claimed class victory at the Mille Miglia. In 1958 Linge secured a class win at the Sebring 12 hour race, with a triumph at the Tour de Corse two years later.

In 1954 he had a lucky escape. Co-driving with Hans Herrmann in the Mille Miglia, the gates of a railroad crossing were lowered in the last moment before the fast train to Rome passed. Driving a very low Porsche 550 Spyder, Herrmann decided it was too late to brake and knocked on the back of the Linge's helmet to make him duck. They barely passed below the gates before the train passed much to the surprise of the spectators.

He then proceeded to notch up another success in 1963, claiming the GT class victory at the Targa Florio.

Aside from his motorsport activities, Linge worked for many years in the international customer service department for Porsche. At 42, he finished his career as a race driver and switched to the newly-founded Porsche Development Centre Weissach, where he remained until ending his professional career as a production manager.

Linge still continued to travel to race tracks around the world after retiring. In 1972 he founded the Deutscher Motor Sport Bund's DMSB-Staffel for the Oberste Nationale Sportbehörde. The ONS-Staffel, is considered the first mobile track marshalling crew, equipped with fast cars like the Porsche 914 or Porsche 911, carrying fire extinguishers and doctors in order to arrive quickly at a crash site. He headed the squad until 1990.

His last post was that of Porsche Carrera Cup manager until 1993.

He is still involved with motor sport and his name regularly graces entry lists of historic rallies - always in connection with legendary Porsche models like the 550 Spyder or the 356 and 904.
. https://www.historicracing.com/driverDe ... 859&otd=on

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#188

Post by Andy »

Everso Biggyballies wrote: 6 months ago A fuller biog for Linge (from15 years ago I have to add) I found on HistoricRacing.com
Herbert Linge was born in Weissach. A works driver and production manager at Porsche AG, Stuttgart, Linge achieved many successes during his 20 years of racing. His impressive list of successes includes 90 class victories and six international records. He contested the Le Mans 24 hour race 15 times, won the Liège-Rome-Liège race in 1954 and in 1957 claimed class victory at the Mille Miglia. In 1958 Linge secured a class win at the Sebring 12 hour race, with a triumph at the Tour de Corse two years later.

In 1954 he had a lucky escape. Co-driving with Hans Herrmann in the Mille Miglia, the gates of a railroad crossing were lowered in the last moment before the fast train to Rome passed. Driving a very low Porsche 550 Spyder, Herrmann decided it was too late to brake and knocked on the back of the Linge's helmet to make him duck. They barely passed below the gates before the train passed much to the surprise of the spectators.

He then proceeded to notch up another success in 1963, claiming the GT class victory at the Targa Florio.

Aside from his motorsport activities, Linge worked for many years in the international customer service department for Porsche. At 42, he finished his career as a race driver and switched to the newly-founded Porsche Development Centre Weissach, where he remained until ending his professional career as a production manager.

Linge still continued to travel to race tracks around the world after retiring. In 1972 he founded the Deutscher Motor Sport Bund's DMSB-Staffel for the Oberste Nationale Sportbehörde. The ONS-Staffel, is considered the first mobile track marshalling crew, equipped with fast cars like the Porsche 914 or Porsche 911, carrying fire extinguishers and doctors in order to arrive quickly at a crash site. He headed the squad until 1990.

His last post was that of Porsche Carrera Cup manager until 1993.

He is still involved with motor sport and his name regularly graces entry lists of historic rallies - always in connection with legendary Porsche models like the 550 Spyder or the 356 and 904.
. https://www.historicracing.com/driverDe ... 859&otd=on
And he had been Steve McQueens double in the Le Mans movie for the racing scenes
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#189

Post by SBan83 »

Andy wrote: 6 months ago
Everso Biggyballies wrote: 6 months ago A fuller biog for Linge (from15 years ago I have to add) I found on HistoricRacing.com
Herbert Linge was born in Weissach. A works driver and production manager at Porsche AG, Stuttgart, Linge achieved many successes during his 20 years of racing. His impressive list of successes includes 90 class victories and six international records. He contested the Le Mans 24 hour race 15 times, won the Liège-Rome-Liège race in 1954 and in 1957 claimed class victory at the Mille Miglia. In 1958 Linge secured a class win at the Sebring 12 hour race, with a triumph at the Tour de Corse two years later.

In 1954 he had a lucky escape. Co-driving with Hans Herrmann in the Mille Miglia, the gates of a railroad crossing were lowered in the last moment before the fast train to Rome passed. Driving a very low Porsche 550 Spyder, Herrmann decided it was too late to brake and knocked on the back of the Linge's helmet to make him duck. They barely passed below the gates before the train passed much to the surprise of the spectators.

He then proceeded to notch up another success in 1963, claiming the GT class victory at the Targa Florio.

Aside from his motorsport activities, Linge worked for many years in the international customer service department for Porsche. At 42, he finished his career as a race driver and switched to the newly-founded Porsche Development Centre Weissach, where he remained until ending his professional career as a production manager.

Linge still continued to travel to race tracks around the world after retiring. In 1972 he founded the Deutscher Motor Sport Bund's DMSB-Staffel for the Oberste Nationale Sportbehörde. The ONS-Staffel, is considered the first mobile track marshalling crew, equipped with fast cars like the Porsche 914 or Porsche 911, carrying fire extinguishers and doctors in order to arrive quickly at a crash site. He headed the squad until 1990.

His last post was that of Porsche Carrera Cup manager until 1993.

He is still involved with motor sport and his name regularly graces entry lists of historic rallies - always in connection with legendary Porsche models like the 550 Spyder or the 356 and 904.
. https://www.historicracing.com/driverDe ... 859&otd=on
And he had been Steve McQueens double in the Le Mans movie for the racing scenes
Oh, I always thought McQueen did all riding and driving scenes himself, including in The Great Escape and Bullitt prior to Le Mans, especially given he actually raced those cars in real life. Andretti famously beat the Porsche of McQueen and Revson, I think, in the 1970 (?) Sebring 12 hours because he didn't want McQueen getting credit for Revson doing most of the heavy lifting. :haha:
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#190

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

SBan83 wrote: 6 months ago
Andy wrote: 6 months ago And he had been Steve McQueens double in the Le Mans movie for the racing scenes
Oh, I always thought McQueen did all riding and driving scenes himself, including in The Great Escape and Bullitt prior to Le Mans, especially given he actually raced those cars in real life. Andretti famously beat the Porsche of McQueen and Revson, I think, in the 1970 (?) Sebring 12 hours because he didn't want McQueen getting credit for Revson doing most of the heavy lifting. :haha:
I must admit I thought the same..... this link to the official Le Mans Web site claims as @SBan83 and I thought. that McQueen had no double and lists reasons why not.
https://www.24h-lemans.com/en/news/behi ... ideo-22668

Edit: However further reading of the full Porsche tribute shows that Linge was involved in the Le Mans film, driving the McQueen 908 Camera car due to Insurance issues with McQueen participating in the actual race. Also an issue with a non compliant car.

Here is the full Porsche tribute to Linge with the reference to the Le Mans movie in bold.
Porsche mourns the loss of Herbert Linge
05/01/2024
Dr Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG is mourning the loss of the former racing driver and Operations Manager of the Weissach Development Centre, Herbert Linge, who died on 5 January 2024 aged 95. Linge played an instrumental role in setting up Porsche’s proving ground, while through his work with motorsport’s governing body he was responsible for the introduction of life-saving measures at racing tracks around the world.

Herbert Linge has been, and will always be, an integral part of Porsche's history. He was one of the company's very first apprentices and in the late 1950s was the man who suggested to Ferry Porsche that a site near his hometown of Weissach and the neighbouring settlement of Flacht be used for testing and development.

"We are saddened by the news of Herbert Linge’s death,” says Michael Steiner, Member of the Executive Board for Research and Development. "Not only was he a Porsche man from the very beginning, but also a friend for many decades. We would like to thank him for his commitment as a racing and rally driver, as a source of ideas and as a technician. Linge was a visionary and one of the great characters of the Weissach Development Centre. He played a leading role in establishing an aftersales network in the US and was particularly committed to safety in motorsport. We and the global Porsche family will never forget him."

Image
Herbert Linge, 2018, Porsche AG

Dr Wolfgang Porsche, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Porsche AG, adds: "Herbert Linge knew my grandfather personally. Thanks to colleagues like him, Porsche was able to re-establish and internationally expand its business activities in Stuttgart with my father Ferry. For that, we are very grateful. Our thoughts are with his family."

Born on 11 June 1928 in Weissach, Herbert Linge received his first Porsche ID card on 7 April 1943 at the age of 14. Six years later, he was the first mechanic employed by Porsche after it moved from Gmünd to Stuttgart. Until his death, Linge was one of the few remaining people to have known Ferdinand Porsche personally. He was involved in the development of the first Porsche 356 built in Stuttgart. The company’s early sports cars were not delivered until Linge had test-driven them. From 1952 onwards, he travelled regularly to the US to set up a nationwide aftersales network. As many employees were encouraged to make the most of their various skills in the early years of the sports car manufacturer, Linge was able to prove himself as a development driver. He was valued by racing drivers and colleagues as a gifted mechanic and analyst as well as showing a talent for racing himself. His co-drivers would rave about the precision with which he drove sports cars, while others admired him for his level-headedness and the fact that nothing could rattle the swift Swabian.

Iconic races and a stint as a double for Steve McQueen
Herbert Linge was awarded the Mexican Order of Merit for three consecutive class victories as a co-driving mechanic in the Carrera Panamericana from 1952 to 1954. Seated alongside Hans Herrmann, the pair secured a class victory in a 550 Spyder at the Mille Miglia in 1954 – a race that would become the stuff of legends after the duo were forced to duck down to pass under the closing barrier of a railway crossing. Linge went on to celebrate further class wins not only at the Mille Miglia, but also at the Targa Florio. He finished as the overall winner of the 1954 Liège-Rome-Liège Rally, the 1960 Tour de Corse and the 1967 Marathon de la Route at the Nürburgring. He started 11 times at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, with eight rankings and several class wins. In 1965, together with Peter Nöcker, he won the Index of Performance award at Le Mans for the most economical ratio of fuel consumption to engine capacity. That same year, Linge and the then future Porsche racing director Peter Falk finished fifth in the Monte Carlo Rally – the first major motorsport success for the early 911.

Image
Herbert Linge, 2016, Targa Florio, Sizilien, 2016, Porsche AG

In 1970, he took part in the 24 Hours of Le Mans in a Porsche 908 that had been converted into a camera car for filming, and he afterwards doubled for Steve McQueen in the racing scenes for the ‘Le Mans’ film. “Porsche and McQueen had an extremely good relationship. Our racing director at the time was fully behind the film and we supported McQueen wherever we could,” Linge once recalled. “Steve couldn't take part in the real race himself for insurance reasons and didn't have a car that complied with the official regulations. But he wanted the real pictures for his film – and I got them for him with the 908.”

Honoured with the Federal Cross of Merit
With improving safety in motorsport high on his personal agenda, Linge founded the safety arm of Germany’s Supreme National Sports Commission for Motorsport (ONS) in 1972. Together with those who drove them, these safety cars fitted with fire extinguishers saved the lives of numerous racing drivers in the 1970s and 80s. Ten years after the creation of ONS-Staffel, Linge was awarded the Federal Cross of Merit in honour of his lifetime achievement. Incidentally, his first ONS service car was a Porsche 914/6 GT, which took part in the 1971 Monte Carlo Rally. The car, equipped with safety apparatus and a fire extinguishing system, became known as the ‘fastest fire engine in the world’.


Image
Herbert Linge, ONS track safety team, 911 Carrera RSR 2.8, model year 1973, 914/6 GT, model year 1972, Nürburgring, 1973, Porsche AG

After retiring from his role as Operations Manager at the Weissach Development Centre in 1987, Linge continued to work as a motorsport consultant. A true visionary, he would go on to head a racing series from 1990 that celebrated worldwide success: the Carrera Cup. The honoured citizen of Weissach remained closely associated with Porsche in the decades that followed. For many years he continued to travel with Porsche, making appearances at motor shows and events marking various milestones in the company’s rich history. Fans loved to hear the anecdotes of the modest Swabian, whose life at and with Porsche wrote many special stories.
https://newsroom.porsche.com/en/2024/hi ... 34887.html


Perhaps if we want to discuss the Le Mans movie issue further we should take it to its own thread rather than continue to discuss a peripheral issue in what is a tribute thread. Just a thought. :wink:

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#191

Post by EB »

McQueen definitely did not do the stunt driving in Bullitt. He was pulled from the car after nearly losing it very early on during one of the first chase sequences. I believe the stunt guy who took over also did the trickier stuff on the Great Escape. I can't recall his name but can check tomorrow.
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#192

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

EB wrote: 6 months ago McQueen definitely did not do the stunt driving in Bullitt. He was pulled from the car after nearly losing it very early on during one of the first chase sequences. I believe the stunt guy who took over also did the trickier stuff on the Great Escape. I can't recall his name but can check tomorrow.
Bud Ekins, a friend of Steve's, did 'The Great Escape major stunts....he was a great Champion Motocross rider in his day. In fact he tutored Steve in off road racing long prior to his stuntwork. The Great Escape work launched Ekins into the world of movie stuntwork. He also did stunt work in Bullitt, driving the (McQueen) Mustang in car chase scenes. (Bullitt info from his Wiki entry which has more details on his career pre stuntwork and after. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bud_Ekins

Bud passed away in 2007 of natural causes, aged 77.

From the LA Times at the time of Bud's passing.
Bud Ekins, a pioneering champion off-road motorcyclist and a veteran stuntman who doubled for Steve McQueen on the famous motorcycle jump in “The Great Escape,” has died. He was 77.

Ekins died Saturday of natural causes at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, publicist Paul Bloch said.

A 1999 inductee of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame, Ekins was one of the first Americans to compete in the World Championship Motocross Grand Prix circuit in Europe during the 1950s. And by the mid-’50s, he was the top scrambles and desert rider in Southern California and had been district champion seven times.

His friendship with fellow motorcyclist McQueen, whom he helped teach off-road racing, launched Ekins’ career as a movie stuntman.

Over the years, he amassed numerous stunt credits including the TV series “ChiPs” and films such as “Diamonds Are Forever,” “Earthquake,” “The Towering Inferno,” “Animal House” and “The Blues Brothers.”

But Ekins’ most famous stunt work was on his first job: doubling for McQueen in the climactic motorcycle jump over a high, barbed-wire fence in the 1963 World War II prisoner-of-war movie “The Great Escape.”

“Steve could have done it himself,” said Bob Hoy, a stuntman friend of Ekins. “He did the lead-up to it and rode the bike wherever he was running in that escape, but Bud did the jump. It was a tough jump. You only can do that kind of thing once; you either make it or you don’t make it.”
https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm ... 20was%2077.


RIP Bud Ekins
. :rip:

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#193

Post by acerogers58 »

RIP Tim Steele (1968-2024)

3 time ARCA champion Tim Steele has passed away aged 55. Steele won the 1993, 1996 and 1997 ARCA titles. He accrued 41 wins, 86 top fives, 101 top 10s and led 5,453 laps in his 147-race ARCA career. His promising career was cut short in late 1997 after he suffered brain injuries in a testing crash at Atlanta, which came reportedly 10 days before he was to sign a contract to race in the NASCAR Cup series full time in 1998. Sponsors for the car would of included Sony and Nike.

Steele did return to racing in ARCA the following year on a part time basis, but only run one full time season for the rest of his career, coming in 2000. He retired during 2007 as he still felt the lingering effects of the severe head injury suffered in that crash.

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#194

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

JOHN WEBB: 1931 - 2024
12 JANUARY 2024


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John Webb Of Brands Hatch
John Webb of Motor Circuit Developments, general manager of Brands Hatch Circuit, pictured at the motor racing circuit in Fawkham, Kent on 10th March 1972

John Webb, who passed away on Thursday at the age of 92, will forever be synonymous with the Brands Hatch circuit in Kent. John Webb, who oversaw Brands Hatch’s era as the home of British and European Grands Prix throughout the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s, has died in Spain at the age of 92. The man in charge of Brands Hatch during its golden Grand Prix era was a simple racing fan at heart. Webb,was a leading visionary in British motorsport whose entrepreneurial skills moulded its structure over nearly four decades.

John was resposible not only for achievments at hosting F1 Championship events but had his heart in club type racing as well.... (@PTRACER John was responsible for the FF2000 category being born, not to mention Formula Atlantic, Thundersports and Thundersaloons amongst other great categories over the years. At the International end he implemented Brands Hatch fholding the non-championship Race of Champions F1 events, in addition to the 1000km World Sportscar Championship vents, often with Webb’s long-time ally, the late Brian Jones, behind the microphone. Other innovations from Webb’s era included the introduction of Formula Ford and Formula 5000 to UK circuits. It was a Motorsport Utopia.

Without my realising it at the time , with Brands Hatch being my most frequented track from the late sixties, Webb, because of the brilliant selection of categories and events run at Brands, is probably as much responsible for my motorsports passion as my Father.

Thank you John. (Thanks Dad too!)

RIP John Webb

Needless to say many tributes and obituaries surfacing.....
John Webb was born on 10 February 1931 in Caversham, just outside Reading, the son of an accountant. Born with dislocated hips, he walked with a distinctive rolling gait, having been told that nothing could be done and that he might even be in a wheelchair by the age of 25.

The young Webb, who was “nuts about aeroplanes and railway engines”, but not about road cars, was sent to a private school where he showed an aptitude for mathematics and history. His father wanted him to join a bank “because you get a pension”, but instead he left at the age of 16 to pursue a career in press and publicity work for the aircraft industry.

His first job was at Miles Aircraft, an aeroplane manufacturer based at Woodley in Berkshire. He immediately showed a flair for publicity and also became a freelance aviation journalist. When the company went broke, Webb worked for the Royal Aero Club before becoming assistant press officer for the Farnborough Air Show. He then took over press work for Silver City Airways, which was the first company to fly cars across the English Channel commercially.

To the young Webb, generating publicity about such a glamorous subject came easy, and in September 1953 he formed his own press and PR company. One of his first new clients was Brands Hatch, which at the time was managed by John Hall, an accountant appointed by the shareholders in order to safeguard their investment.

Webb’s first impression of the place wasn’t exactly favourable, and he described it as having poor amenities, but he pressed ahead with writing and sending out press releases detailing forthcoming meetings. One of his first specific jobs, in February 1954, was to announce the opening of the Druids loop extension to the track.

Up until this point, Webb’s interest had been almost exclusively in aircraft. But as a result of the Brands involvement, he also acquired the account for the Connaught Formula 1 team and began to take more of an interest in motor racing, acquiring a Jenson 541 that he entered in various races, sprints and hillclimbs with a degree of success, at one time holding the Brands Hatch saloon car lap record.


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Brands Hatch hosted its first British Grand Prix in July 1974.
(Graham Hill, BRM P261, follows Dan Gurney, Brabham BT7 Climax, and Jim Clark, Lotus 25 Climax, at the start into Paddock Hill Bend)


Webb’s fertile mind was always looking for new way to publicise Brands Hatch, and one innovation was the 1954 Boxing Day meeting, at which 20,000 spectators turned up on 26 December for a seven-race event that included an ox-roast and Stirling Moss dressed up as Father Christmas.

In January 1960 the Grand Prix loop was added to the circuit and, less than a year later, the track underwent a complete change of ownership, with Grovewood Securities Ltd, a general investment company headed-up by John Danny, taking over. Three other circuits were acquired – Oulton Park, Mallory Park and Snetterton – and in May 1966, a separate company, Motor Circuit Developments Ltd, was formed, with Webb as full-time executive director.

Prior to that, in July 1964 Brands Hatch had hosted its first British Grand Prix, which then alternated between there and Silverstone for the next 22 years. Webb was criticised at the time by some purists for providing a spectacle for the paying public with a number of activities ancillary to the racing. It could be said that he was pointing the way for the ‘festival’ style of entertainment that is so prevalent at today’s grands prix.

The following year Webb instigated a season-opening non-championship Formula 1 race, the Race of Champions, which continued until 1983.

Webb was instrumental in introducing a number of innovations to British motorsport, but perhaps the most successful and long-lasting was the concept of Formula Ford, which provided a cost-effective introduction to racing for many, while at the top of the scale the noisy, ground-trembling Formula 5000 cars also proved hugely popular.

There were many other Webb-inspired formulae that came and went over the years – Formula F100, Formula Ford 2000, Sports 2000, Formula Atlantic, Multisports, Formula Turbo Ford, Formula First, Thundersports and Thundersaloons to name just a few – with some enjoying more success than others. There was even a methanol-fuelled Formula Talbot as an insurance against the petrol crisis.

At the bi-annual Grand Prix, Webb continued to offer ever-more lavish entertainment for the spectators, particularly in the form of spectacular air displays. The Red Arrows put in their first appearance at the 1966 event and were joined over the years by a Vulcan V-bomber, a Harrier Jump Jet, and even Concorde, which diverted while on a scheduled flight to the Middle East.

Webb retired with his wife Angela to Spain in 1989, but continued to take an active interest in motorsport.
https://www.autosport.com/national/news ... /10565201/




Jonathan Palmer, now the owner of Brands Hatch and other circuits through his MSV operation had some words to say on hearing of John passing.
After 35 years at the heart of Brands Hatch, and later the wider group, Webb left in 1989 during the Foulston era. Whilst that marked the end of his day-to-day involvement with Brands Hatch, it wasn’t to be his final contact. Indeed, I (Jonathan Palmer) sought Webb out as a consultant during the early days of the MSV era, as I sought to restore the circuit’s reputation after two decades of deterioration.

"John Webb was one of the greatest promoters of motorsport this country has ever seen, and an extraordinary pioneer. He thrived in an exciting era of growth and opportunity and never missed a chance to innovate and put his circuits and products on the map. In short, he made things happen.

“When MSV took over the Brands Hatch group of circuits I really wanted to understand the views of John and his wife Angela, who were living in Spain. I was delighted that they were pleased to be of help and have some involvement in their old circuits again. During that critical transition phase, we also had some lovely entertaining evenings in Spain with John and Angela, and my thoughts and sympathies are with Angela and all of John’s friends at this sad time.”

* I started life with nothing, and still have most of it left


“Good drivers have dead flies on the side windows!” (Walter Röhrl)

* I married Miss Right. Just didn't know her first name was Always
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Post by erwin greven »

Veteran NASCAR crew chief Ryan Pemberton dies at 54

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By Kelly Crandall | January 15, 2024 5:01 PM ET

Ryan Pemberton, a veteran of the NASCAR garage, died on Sunday. He was 54.

Pemberton most recently worked with JR Motorsports as the competition director for the NASCAR Xfinity Series program. In the decade Pemberton spent with the company, it won the driver’s championship three times – first with Chase Elliott (2014) and later with Tyler Reddick (2018 and 2019).

Much of what Pemberton will be remembered for was his time spent atop the pit box as a crew chief. Pemberton oversaw the No. 7 team at JR Motorsports in 2014 and guided Regan Smith to a victory.

“Ryan was instrumental to JR Motorsports’ success during the decade he spent with us,” Kelley Earnhardt Miller said in a statement. “He had such a passion for competition and, as a leader, knew how to motivate everyone he worked with. He will always be part of the JRM family. Our hearts go out to his wife Andrea and daughters Payton and Britton during this tremendously difficult time.”

Pemberton earned three victories as a Xfinity Series crew chief in 76 starts, doing so with Larry Pearson and Smith. At the Cup Series level (561 starts), Pemberton won a race with Joe Nemechek in 2004 and Brian Vickers in 2009.

Among the drivers Pemberton worked with throughout his career were Derrike Cope, Ernie Irvan, Jerry Nadeau, Dave Blaney, Joe Nemechek and Mark Martin. It was Pemberton and Martin who were on the losing end of a photo finish with Kevin Harvick in the 2007 Daytona 500.

Pemberton hailed from a racing family that includes older brother Robin being the former vice president of competition for NASCAR. Ryan Pemberton got his start in NASCAR 1988 with Jack Roush.

The Pemberton family has suffered multiple losses in recent years. Randy Pemberton, Ryan and Robin’s brother, died in 2022. He was a television broadcaster in the sport. Bray Pemberton, Ryan’s nephew and the son of Robin, died in 2021.
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His trucks:

DAF NTT 2800 "De Neus" (The Nose) (1982)
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Drivers: De Rooy/Straetmans

DAF 3300 4x4 "De Koffer" (The Suitcase) (1983)
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Drivers: De Rooy/Roggeband/Perry

DAF 3300 4x4 "Tweekoppige Monster" (Two Headed Monster) (1984)
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Drivers: De Rooy/Roggeband/Geusens

DAF 3300 4x4 "The Bull" (1985)
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Drivers: De Rooy/De Saulieu/Ketelaars

DAF 3600 4x4 Turbo Twin (1986)
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Drivers: De Rooy/De Saulieu/Geusens

DAF 3600 4x4 Turbo Twin II (1987)
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Drivers: De Rooy/Geusens/Van de Rijt

DAF Turbo Twin 95 X1 (1988) #600
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Drivers: De Rooy/Geusens/Duisters

The mythical overtaking of a car by a truck at 200km/h in the 1988 Dakar

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There have been countless epic moments in the history of the Dakar Rally but one stands above them all: a truck overtaking at 200 km/h a car at Dakar 1988.

The memorable duel sustained by both vehicles at more than 200 km / h on the sands of Africa remains one of the most iconic images in the world of motorsports.


The happy 80s

The duel –a truck overtaking at 200 km/h a car at Dakar- took place during the ‘crazy’ 80s when the world of motorsports lived a fever for power and extreme performance. Examples of this are the wild Group B of the World Rally Championship, the Group C in the Endurance Championship and the Dakar trucks. Speed was the only thing that mattered.

It was an especially creative – and sometimes foolish – time for car engineers. Despite being criticized for the reckless increases of power across vehicles the FIA kept on looking the other way.

As rumours grew of a cross-disciplinary power cap an exodus began towards the famous Rally, a lessee–fair paradise, free from regulation and restrictions. This was how the legendary image of that truck overtaking a car came to be.


The dream of a Dutch millionaire

Jan De Rooy, a wealthy Dutch businessman, owner of the largest transport company in his country, caught the fever of the moment and started nurturing a very particular dream: to defeat a Dakar car with a truck.

He enrolled in the Dakar in 1982 for the first time with an ordinary 200hp DAF. Although he had to abandon, he became convinced his dream was feasible.

Over the years he perfected his concept. He wanted to win the toughest race in the world with a mechanic ‘monster’ of several tons of weight. And he would not stop until he managed to do so.

Today, this goal may seem extravagant to say the least but, in those times, with no speed or power limitations, it didn’t seem so crazy. Almost everything was allowed from a technical point of view.

Meanwhile, De Rooy kept on trying and having to abandon. When he finally made it to the chequered flag it was in the 38th position. The year after he went up to the 34th. A truck overtaking at 200 km/h a car at Dakar 1988 was coming

Jan’s ‘missiles’

Spurred by his poor results and inspired by the spirit of the time, he started to work on several ‘experiments’. The first of these was the DAF ‘Tweekoppige Monster‘, a twin-engine truck with two cabins and an engine on each axle.

Although the machine boosted a whopping 800 hp, Jan had to retire. Despite the (relative) failure, the beast became one of the most extravagant models in memory.

DAF F3300, the Turbo Twin I

In the following season, he entered a DAF F3300 with two engines, a front one with 420hp that propelled the rear axle, and another one with 340hp which did the same with the front one.

He was the winner of his category, although he lost the title after receiving a fifteen-hour penalty for carrying out prohibited repairs, falling to second place.

DAF FAV 3600 Turbo Twin or Turbo Twin I

De Rooy returned in 1986 with the backing of the DAF manufacturer, who trusted in the Dutchman’s perseverance and skill. From this joined venture the DAF FAV 3600 Turbo Twin was born boasting two 500 hp turbocharged engines associated with automatic gearboxes.



Such power, together with a reduced load of just three spare wheels and a basic set of tools, allowed it to fire its 10.5 tons at 200 km / h.

The new model was able to fight face to face with the cars and stayed in the Top 10 until there were only three stages to go. Then its front axle broke and De Rooy had to say goodbye to his title hopes.

Turbo Twin II

Despite the disappointment, De Rooy returned the following season having made several modifications to reduce the truck’s weight to one ton. He also installed the lighter cabin from the DAF 3600 and carried out several aerodynamic improvements.

He had an overwhelming victory in the truck category, but he didn’t even make the top ten of the general classification. A step before a truck overtaking at 200 km/h a car at Dakar 1988.


The 1.200 hp beast: DAF Turbo Twin X1

At last the ultimate desert beast was born, the DAF Turbo Twin X1. It had two 600hp engines and six turbos, three of them with variable geometry in each propeller for optimal performance. It also had two automatic and synchronized gearboxes which were operated with a single lever. Its eternal torque made it an unbeatable contender in the dunes.




It went from 0 to 100 km / h in 8.5 seconds and had a self-limited top speed of 220 km / h. In that edition, he entered two units. One of them was driven by his friend Theo Van de Rijt and it was to serve as an assistant to the other, driven by De Rooy.

It was in that race that Jan engaged in the famous duel finally passing the Peugeot 405 T16 of Ari Vatanen at over 200 km / h and leaving one of the best moments in the history of the raid.

The tragedy

Tragedy struck just a few days after De Rooy’s feat. It happened at the Djabo-Adadez stage near the Tenere desert. The DAF of his colleague Van de Rijt suffered a brutal accident after jumping a dune at about 200 km / h.



The truck rolled over six times. As a result of the impact, co-pilot Kees van Loevezijn was expelled from the cockpit through the windshield and died on the spot. The driver and the mechanic were seriously injured.

After the accident, the team decided to retire from the race. They were fifth in the standings. His dream vanished forever. Race organizers, the Thierry Sabine Organization (TSO), banned the T4 truck category as a result.
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Brian Redman: "Mr. Fangio, how do you come so fast?" "More throttle, less brakes...."
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