RACE FOR GLORY. New "Audi v Lancia" Group B movie - Trailer released

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RACE FOR GLORY. New "Audi v Lancia" Group B movie - Trailer released

#1

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

Group B Rallying has joined the rush (sic) of Motor Sport "INSPIRED" movies (I highlight the word inspired as to a fear of it being more fiction, Hollywood driven over dramatised etc. I hope I am wrong. DTS has made me suspicious!

Filming locations include Italy and Greece, including some of the places where the events depicted took place, such as the Lancia office and the Circuito di Balocco. Hopefully plenty of genuine footage incorporated.


The film depicts the rivalry between the teams driving Audi Quattro and Lancia 037 rally cars at the 1983 World Rally Championship.
The film is directed by Stefano Mordini, with Daniel Brühl and Riccardo Scamarcio in starring roles as Roland Gumpert and Cesare Fiorio.

Cast
Daniel Brühl as Roland Gumpert
Riccardo Scamarcio as Cesare Fiorio
Volker Bruch as Walter Röhrl
Katie Clarkson-Hill as Jane McCoy (No idea who or what she is or what her role is.... )

Its a brilliant subject about an iconic era of WRC in what was a bordering on Supercars.... exciting cars too fast and powerful, sadly countered with some high profile crashes and losses of life lead to it being somewhat shortlived and banned .

Im excited of the concept and will without doubt watch it when it comes around, It is supposedly in post production and has been for a year so maybe not far away with Trailers and stuff popping up.

Edit: Just added this poster I found which indicates its release is a month away in Jan 2024.

Image
Trailer for 'Race For Glory: Audi vs Lancia' Starring Riccardo Scamarcio
by Alex Billington
December 4, 2023
Source: YouTube

Race For Glory: Audi vs Lancia Trailer

"You can't beat them with a normal car." "Yes we can… if you drive it." Yet another racing movie on the horizon. Lionsgate Movies has unveiled an official trailer for Race For Glory: Audi vs Lancia, formerly known as simply 2 Win (all of these titles are bad). This project is an Italy / UK / Ireland co-production directed by an Italian filmmaker, and starring, co-written by, and produced by the Italian actor Riccardo Scamarcio. Inspired by true events that occurred during the fierce rivalry between Germany (Audi) and Italy (Lancia) at the 1983 Rally World Championships. Race For Glory stars Riccardo Scamarcio as rally driver Cesare Fiorio, Volker Bruch as racing champion Walter Röhrl, with Katie Clarkson-Hill, Esther Garrel, Giorgio Montanini, Gianmaria Martini, Haley Bennett, and featuring Daniel Brühl as the German engineer Roland Gumpert, founder of the sports car manufacturer Apollo Automobil. This is being dumped in theaters and on VOD at the same time in early January, never a good sign. This is pretty much a replica of Mann's Ferrari in many ways, which is the one getting more attention as it opens in theaters soon
https://www.firstshowing.net/2023/trail ... scamarcio/



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#2

Post by SBan83 »

I suppose this could be good but I already see a lot of hammy/cringe acting. At least filming rallying is easier than trying to pass off Donington as Fuji, as Rush did. Still, it's good to see historic racing in mainstream cinema a lot in recent years, with Rush, Ford v Ferrari, Lamborghini, and now this Race for Glory and the upcoming Ferrari movie.

Hopefully they got some proper pros to do the driving scenes. Neuville, Latvala do a lot of historic rallying, plus Rohrl is still active in exhibition events, I think.
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#3

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

SBan83 wrote: 2 months ago I suppose this could be good but I already see a lot of hammy/cringe acting. At least filming rallying is easier than trying to pass off Donington as Fuji, as Rush did. Still, it's good to see historic racing in mainstream cinema a lot in recent years, with Rush, Ford v Ferrari, Lamborghini, and now this Race for Glory and the upcoming Ferrari movie.

Hopefully they got some proper pros to do the driving scenes. Neuville, Latvala do a lot of historic rallying, plus Rohrl is still active in exhibition events, I think.
Agree re the 'proper drivers' bit and yeah I see hints of things in the trailer that raised the doubts I outlined, but I am trying to look at it "Glass half full rather than half empty!" :fingers: :fingers: :fingers:

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#4

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'Real cars, real sound, real engines': Audi vs Lancia film recreates epic 1983 WRC battle

Motor racing movies are in vogue. This Christmas, Michael Mann’s Ferrari will finally be released after a 30-year gestation, starring Adam Driver as Enzo. Much more on that to come from Motor Sport. But there’s another film set for release on January 5 that I’m a little more excited about, partly because it tackles a far less obvious subject.

Can you think of a movie focused specifically on the World Rally Championship? I might have missed something, but I’m not sure one exists. That’s changed now. You might have spotted the trailer, which has been released this week. It’s called Race for Glory and is centred around the battle that raged between Audi and Lancia in 1983 during the beloved Group B era. As I say, not exactly an obvious choice – and the prospect looks promising.

Now, Motor Sport hasn’t seen the movie yet. But in the summer of 2022 I was invited on to the set for a day to watch the filming of the final scenes, just off the sea front in Sanremo. The movie concludes with Lancia achieving its against-the-odds ambition of beating the might of vorsprung durch technik and Audi’s game-changing four-wheel-drive Quattro, with its achingly pretty but only two-wheel-driven 037 – the last time a car limited to rear traction alone claimed a WRC crown. The production crew had recreated the Sanremo service park and finishing ramp in the precise location the rally finished back in 1983, with genuine period cars and fantastically recreated service vehicles.

Originally the movie was to be called 2 WIN, which I always thought was an awkward title. It made me think of the transportation company of the same name and its silver articulated lorries. The producers have presumably had second thoughts too, because the trailer has launched under the new moniker. Race for Glory is rather generic and a little uninspiring, but it’s probably easier to market than the original choice.

The movie is a truly European effort created in collaboration between Italian and English producers. It can also be described as a personal passion project driven by friends, mutual car enthusiasts and co-producers Riccardo Scamarcio and Jeremy Thomas. Englishman Thomas is a titan of the movie industry with a long string of critically-acclaimed credits behind him – including the Oscar-winning The Last Emperor from the 1980s. Scamarcio is a charismatic and well-known actor and producer in Italian cinema, with a face that reminds one of Benicio del Toro mixed with Gian Maria Volonte, the depraved villain from spaghetti westerns A Fist Full of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More. Scamarcio plays another Machiavellian character, in this case the hero, in the form of scheming Lancia sports boss Cesare Fiorio on whose memories this story is based. Scamarcio wasn’t specifically a rally fan, but met Fiorio and was inspired by his tales. As well as playing the main role, he co-wrote the screenplay with Filippo Bologna and director Stefano Mordini, another respected figure in Italian cinema.

Between takes, I met both Thomas and Scamarcio on set. “I love making films and I love cars,” said Thomas of his motivation to get involved. “They are my two passions. When I heard about this incredible story and the subterfuge within it the stars aligned. The more you dig into it as someone with an understanding about cars — the two-wheel-drive Lancias versus the four-wheel-drive Audis — it was a miracle that Lancia won this championship. Then all these wonderful people came to this film, the director Stefano and Riccardo who turned me on to the project. ‘OK, let’s do it.’”

“It’s a wonderful story,” said Scamarcio. “A very small team with less power beats a big company with a lot of money and technological supremacy. They lose because the most important power is friendship, humanity, sensitivity. This is our subject.”

The most familiar face in the movie is Niki Lauda, who plays Audi team chief Roland Gumpert. I jest, of course… it’s Daniel Brühl, the well-established Hollywood star who was by far the best thing about the James Hunt/Lauda movie Rush. In his second racing turn, the only challenge we might face as an audience is forgetting Brühl isn’t playing the great Austrian this time, such is his physical resemblance.

In terms of drivers, the main focus here is the legendary Walter Röhrl, played by Volker Bruch who at least carries a passing resemblance, even if he inevitably lacks the beanpole imposing physical presence. The story revolves around Fiorio convincing Röhrl to join Lancia and rally its outdated 037 following the reigning champion’s fall-out with Opel. From the trailer, it appears the screenplay taps into Röhrl’s glorious eccentricity, given the scene between the pair while the two-time WRC king is tending to his bees. Röhrl of course takes the bait and inspires the title charge, even if he (somewhat maddeningly) chooses not to chase a third drivers’ crown for himself. Much like Sébastien Ogier and now Kalle Rovanperä in the modern world. As I witnessed, the movie ends with Markku Alen’s victory in Sanremo to secure the constructors’ title, with Röhrl having played his part. Presumably it will also acknowledge Hannu Mikkola’s drivers’ title for the Audi camp – but the point here is the 037 defeating the Quattro in the manufacturers’ standings after a David and Goliath-style duel.

So is it true to history? There are bound to be points of dramatic licence, because there always are with racing movies. Thomas made it clear to me he had no interest in re-telling history via a docu-drama. But both producers emphasised how important authenticity was to them. “Before we wrote the script we had a long discussion over many days with Cesare Fiorio, who is our mentor,” said Scamarcio. “He told us all the secrets about what happened in that 1983 championship. From his real voice we built the script. Of course, it’s cinema and we know how to put the pieces together. But the script in the movie tells exactly what happened. We are very respectful of that. We didn’t invent things that didn’t happen – apart from small adaptations for a cinematic story. But the real story was already so cinematic.”

And the action? I only witnessed Alen’s winning 037 being driven at speed past a chequered flag, then up on to the ceremonial finishing ramp surrounded by cheering Lancia mechanics. Immediately I can sense hardcore rally fans blanching at that description. I know, that’s not how rallying works. But come on – it’s a movie. Let’s give them some rein.

Pleasingly, I was told the use of CGI has been limited to filling in or changing background detail rather than artificially interfering with physics-defying car dynamics – which is a departure from the approach seen in Ferrari, Ford vs Ferrari and Rush. The action scenes, captured in part from helicopters, were filmed in various locations in Italy to recreate the dense forests of Finland, the dusty and rocky terrain of Greece and the picturesque asphalt stages of Sanremo.

“There’s an extraordinary amount of original machinery,” says Thomas. “When I first arrived on set I thought ‘Wow, I’m back in 1983.’ I still find all these cars exciting, and the individual cars have incredible history. It’s the opposite of modern electric vehicles. It’s an analogue past, the road-racing of the day. I wanted to show we are striving so hard to be as authentic as we can, primarily with all the machinery, the logos and what it looked like in 1983.”

“Real cars, real sound, real engines,” said Scamarcio. “We even used the real Lancia 037 chassis number one for when Walter Röhrl first tries the car. We also have real mechanics here who are now 75, but were in their prime in 1983.” I was introduced to them: the celebrated Baldi brothers, Elio and Giovanni, who were engineers for the factory Lancia rally team during the 1980s.

From what I saw, the movie has certainly nailed the right look. And given that Scamarcio has taken inspiration from the 1970s Italian B-movies that also influenced Quentin Tarantino, we can expected a spirited film high on pace, entertainment and humour. This film is supposed to be fun. I’m optimistic that’s exactly what it will be.
https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/arti ... rc-battle/

Well, at least it's reassuring that they're trying to keep artistic liberties to a minimum.
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Daniel Bruhl? Good choice! He did a great job of playing the late Niki Lauda in "Rush" or at least I think he did.
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#7

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Nononsensecapeesh wrote: 2 months ago Daniel Bruhl? Good choice! He did a great job of playing the late Niki Lauda in "Rush" or at least I think he did.
Yes, he played it so well that it took me a while into the trailer to realize this wasn't about a possibly less-documented rallying career that Niki Lauda never had. :rockedover:
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#8

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

I still cant see it on our fave torrent site which is a bit sad.

However what I have seen is the Motorsport review of the 1983 WRC Season. I guess we all know what happened before we see the movie, so reading the season review is hardly a spoiler for the film. I thought some might to be interested in having a read of the 1983 WRC Season, as told back in the day by Motor Sport Magazine in their January 1984 issue.

Just in case anyone has been living under a rock for the past 40-ish years and dont wish to know how it panned out before watching the movie I will leave the Headline out to tempt you. but put the article itself behind the Spoiler wall


Audi v Lancia: epic showdown in 1983 World Rally Championship

The Rally Manufacturers in conflict

If nothing else the 1983 World Rally Championship helped disprove two myths......

Click the spoiler button below to reveal the myths and the story. ( I thought it was a good read)

Audi v Lancia: epic showdown in 1983 World Rally Championship
AUTHOR
M.R.G

The Rally Manufacturers in conflict

If nothing else the 1983 World Rally Championship helped disprove two myths. The first, that Germans are without exception coldly and clinically efficient. The second, that Italians are always in turmoil, always having a crisis. The championship just past would, however, seem to indicate that there had been a complete role reversal.

For those brought up on stories of the ruthlessly efficient Alfred Neubauer and the all-powerful Mercedes Grand Prix team, the activities of the Audi Sport rally team come as something of a shock. The stories of ineptitude and mix-ups within Ferrari and Maserati are legion, but somewhere along the line someone forgot to pass on the message to the small Lancia (née Abarth) rally team about the Italian trait for foul-ups.

However, where both Audi and Lancia did conform to their respective national images was in terms of engineering philosophies. Audi gave every indication that someone, somewhere, felt that increased horsepower was the answer to any problems. Forget how bad the handling may be, brute force would overcome. It is not the contradiction that it may seem to say that despite its four-wheel-drive and turbocharger, the Quattro is unsophisticated. It’s tough, strong, in fact built like a tank. That alone enables it to overcome any human frailties. There are even those within the team itself who refer to the Quattro as the “electronic tractor”. Certainly, the Audi has emerged as a sophisticated machine in concept, but in its application it lacks a certain delicacy or finesse.

Finesse is, however, a word which can be used in the context of the Lancia Rally. With its space-frame chassis it is in many ways the epitome of an Italian competition machine. Purpose-built for the job, it’s light, strong, reliable, easily adaptable and simplicity itself to maintain. It is also apparently a joy to drive, the flexibility of the supercharged four-cylinder 1,995cc engine a matter of some considerable envy amongst the non-Lancia drivers who as the season progressed had to contend with more and more intransigent power units as their employers strove to keep up, mistakenly substituting increased top-end output for a smoother torque curve.

Two, therefore, entirely different solutions to the same problem. At the start of the year it did seem — on paper at least — that the odds were stacked in Audi’s favour. The Ingolstadt team — based in an old supermarket — had made it known that they would be prepared to contest every one of the 12 qualifying events in order to achieve its dual goal — the Makes’ title, and also the Drivers’ Championship. Lancia was more cautious. They really only wanted the Makes’ title. With customary cunning they would pick and choose the rallies which they thought best suited to them. In fact it didn’t quite turn out like that. Lancia ended up chasing Audi — or rather hounding them — to the four corners of the world. Once the Italians had achieved their aim on the penultimate round of the Makes’ Championship (Sanremo), they tactically withdrew, Director of Motorsport Cesare Fiorio announcing that he was considerably over-budget.

In this respect it is beyond any doubt that Audi’s budget was the largest. Motor manufacturers are somewhat coy about discussing such figures (surely they cannot be ashamed?) but conservative estimates indicate that Audi spent £6 million on trying to retain the Makes’ title. In the end they failed, salvaging the Drivers’ Championship for Hannu Mikkola. With no outside backer to help defray the not inconsiderable costs of transporting and maintaining a fleet of rally cars as they travel the world, one would expect Audi’s investment to be proportionately higher than the Martini-sponsored Lancia team.

At a press conference in December to unveil Lancia’s plans for this season, Fiorio said that the budget for the rally and Endurance programme was 10 billion lire — £4.5 million. It is safe to assume that less was spent in 1983, and one also presumes that this is how much the Fiat Group spends, and does not take into account whatever Martini pay for having its indentification on the cars.

However, whatever the outlay, Lancia obviously feel every penny was well spent, particularly as they won the coveted Makes’ Championship for the fifth time and with an evolution car which was in only its first full season of international rallying. In 1982 the fledgling Lancia Rally had stumbled from mechanical crisis to mechanical crisis. It looked bad, talk already suggesting that the 037 Rally (the type number given by Abarth for the project) was too fragile, too much like a Group C racing car to succeed. But Lancia was learning all the time. So much so that during 1983 the Rally earned a reputation for being one of the — if not the — most reliable cars contesting the current World Championship. So much so that it put more conventional machines in the shade — teams like Nissan have in the past been able to set great store and gain results from their unquestioned reliability, but not any more with the advent of the 037 evolution model. The instances of mechanical failure amongst the factory 037s were so rare that one can literally reel them off from memory. There was Jean-Claude Andruet’s supercharger failure on the Monte Carlo Rally, the Frenchman also drawing the short straw on Corsica when the engine seized afer the water injection filled up the car’s combustion chambers, a headgasket failure for Markku Alin on the Acropolis and a misaligned compressor on Walter Röhrl’s Sanremo 037. The Monte, Acropolis and Sanremo problems were corrected during the rallies.

In comparison there were a myriad of problems with the Quattros. Fires, transmission failures, broken engines, turbocharger faults, and even wheel losses dotted Audi’s season. At times it seemed that the team had taken on far too much. They never had time to test and prepare themselves properly, but that apart many of Audi’s dramas were compounded by bad service support. On almost every rally a mechanic managed to do something drastic, and even by the RAC Rally, the final round of the championship, there were still mistakes being made — 20 litres of water in the fuel tank of Michele Mouton’s car, for example.

There is no denying that these errors became a source of constant worry amongst factory drivers Mouton, Mikkola and Stig Blomqvist. One advantage of being a professional factory team driver is that you have the back-up of people which enables you to concentrate on the thing you are being paid to do: drive. Sometimes the Audi trio must have felt that they were back in their early amateur private days. Mikkola, in particular, found it necessary to always check what was going on at a service point. Constantly cajoling and checking, Mikkola never really felt that he could relax.

The saviour of many a bungled service was team manager Roland Gumpert. The 39-year-old engineer was more often than not doing the work of mechanics. It was partly due to the highly regimented German system which dictates that each person is a specialist, and therefore only deals with his own particular problems area, partly a reluctance to do anything unless a specific order is issued. Add to these factors the basic lack of rally experience within the team mechanics — one week they can literally be working on an Audi production line, the next be trying to change a front differential at three in the morning on the top of an icy cold mountain — and one starts to sympathise with Gumpert.

The more the drivers experienced problems, the more they turned to Gumpert for help. The more Gumpert did, the less the mechanics felt inclined to do. It was a classic Catch 22 situation, but there can be no denying that Gumpert doesn’t exactly object to being thrust into the middle of a mechanical problem.

Like the cars they used, there was a complete contrast in styles between the men who ran them. Lancia’s Fiorio would no more think of delving under a bonnet than Audi’s Gumpert would of weaving some devious political web. There is a little doubt that Fiorio is highly politically motivated character. He knows how to manipulate the rules, and those who enforce them. He knows how to motivate his drivers. How to press home an advantage. But he has been at it a long time, and he does have a well structured organisation underneath him. On the other hand there aren’t many drivers who “enjoy” the highly charged politics of the team. in this respect the Lancia rally organisation is typically Italian.

One couldn’t imagine Gumpert manipulating his drivers in the was that Fiorio does. It does seem that Gumpert is sometimes in awe of his trio. Heaven knows how he is going to cope with the arrival of Röhrl this season. Certainly there will have to be a change in approach during 1984, Gumpert having to adapt himself into the role of a manager along the lines of Fiorio. I think he can make the transition, and once he does he could emerge as a match for his Italian counterpart.

The turning point for the championship was undoubtedly Greece. This was the chance for Audi to claw back the two-point deficit from Lancia. With Mouton having won the Acropolis in 1982 the German team started as favourites, and in spite of some appalling service, Mikkola led. Then a boot hinge pin broke. A small failure, but one which resulted in his Quattro’s engine being starved of oil after the massive boot-lid mounted oil cooler pulled itself away from its connecting pipes. As a result Röhrl was a surprise winner, Lancia now having a six-point advantage over Audi.

This totally unexpected result seemed to throw Audi into turmoil, so much so that they lost the next round in New Zealand. After this defeat there was even talk about a tactical withdrawal until the 1000 Lakes, but Gumpert rightly insisted that his team should still go to Argentina. Here were stages and conditions which could have been made for Quattros. With average speeds in three-figures, the need sometimes to change gear on a stage only a couple of times, plus snow, ice and rain it was no surprise that Quattros filled the top four places.

However, although this walk-over did help restore team morale, it basically came too late. Even though Mikkola and Blomqvist finished first and second on the 1000 Lakes, Alen’s tactical third place meant that Lancia maintained its advantage. All that Florio had to do was ensure that his team performed at its peak in Sanremo, there could be no mistakes on Lancia’s home event. There weren’t, and Lancia were champions for the fifth time.

Audi could now only salvage the Drivers’ Championship for Mikkola, and they had to go all the way to the Ivory Coast to do that, although even there they were beaten by Toyota.

It had been a difficult year for Mikkola, probably his last chance ever of becoming World Champion, as in 1984 he has opted for a limited six-rally programme for the factory team. After 10 years at the pinnacle of the sport there is no doubt that he deserves his crown. There have been suggestions that he was given the title by Audi, that it was a hollow success as Lancia didn’t press home the late challenge from its drivers Alen and Röhrl.

It is a fact that Audi decided during the year that both Mouton and Blomqvist should step aside whenever necessary to give Mikkola as much chance as possible of becoming champion. This had been understood by Blomqvist all along. He was in the team to act out a supporting role to either Mouton or Mikkola, the decision to promote the latter’s chances not coming until after the Safari Rally where he was second overall to Art Vatanen’s Opel) and had a clear 28-point lead over Mouton. It got steadily worse after that, both Röhrl and Alen closing in rapidly, and as Mouton slipped further back it was only natural that she should be asked to give Hannu whatever support was necessary.

As it turned out there was only one clear-cut incident when a team-mate was asked to slow down — Argentina, where Blomqvist backed off to let Mikkola through and earn himself another five points, the difference between first and second. The 1000 Lakes in Finland was less clear-cut. Mikkola had put in a brilliant drive, overcoming all sorts of delays and problems, to be on Blomqvist’s tail as the rally reached its climax. Gumpert says that no team orders were issued, but there is no doubt there was some discussion between the trio prior to the final stages. Mikkola did catch and pass Blomqvist, the Swede not retaliating.

If Lancia had gone to both the Ivory Coast and RAC rallies then the result of the championship could have been very different. But there was never any chance that Florio would send a car to West Africa — it was too close to Sanremo for him to make any last-minute arrangements — so the fact that Mikkola finished second behind Bjorn Waldegård in a Toyota Celica Turbo, effectively put the title behind the grasp of Alen. Röhrl could still snatch the championship if he had come to the RAC, and if he had won, but against the Finn on unseen roads it is doubtful whether the German would have managed the task in view of his dislike of non-practice rallies.

Hannu Mikkola is a worthy World Champion, it hardly being his fault (or problem) that FISA’s continuing policy means that there are still two World Championships run in tandem. The need to have two events which count for just the Drivers’ Championship (Sweden and Ivory Coast) is an anachronism. If these events aren’t good enough for inclusion in the Makes’ Championship then why include them at all? Certainly the Ivory Coast is the least popular event of the season, and whilst Sweden is well organised and promoted, its specialist nature as a snow rally puts off a lot of people. But why should it be considered more specialist than, say, the roads of Corsica?

There is a growing feeling that 12 events are simply too many. If a team is to contest the entire championship then it places an almost impossible strain on personnel. A much more sensible solution would be to have a 10-round World Championship, the best eight results to count for both a Drivers’ and a Makes ‘title. That would stop teams like Lancia being able to pick and choose, thereby creating a more meaningful series with all the rounds contested by the leading teams. Then we would start to have a real World Championship. — M.R.G.
https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/arch ... -v-lancia/

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#9

Post by SBan83 »

@Everso Biggyballies : It's there on R4E and also on all major torrent sites.
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Post by Everso Biggyballies »

SBan83 wrote: 1 month ago @Everso Biggyballies : It's there on R4E and also on all major torrent sites.
I entered it (Race for Glory) in the search on R4Me and got only something from 1989 and another a NASCAR thing.
I did a google search for a torrent and got one that set my antivirus off and unsafe site warnings. :suspicious:

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#11

Post by SBan83 »

Everso Biggyballies wrote: 1 month ago
SBan83 wrote: 1 month ago @Everso Biggyballies : It's there on R4E and also on all major torrent sites.
I entered it (Race for Glory) in the search on R4Me and got only something from 1989 and another a NASCAR thing.
I did a google search for a torrent and got one that set my antivirus off and unsafe site warnings. :suspicious:
Oh, R4E is Racing for Everyone. It's an alternative to RfM that's open to everyone without needing an invite.
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Everso Biggyballies
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Posts: 48390
Joined: 18 years ago
Real Name: Chris
Favourite Motorsport: Anything that goes left and right.
Favourite Racing Car: Too Many to mention
Favourite Driver: Kimi,Niki,Jim(none called Michael)
Favourite Circuit: Nordschleife, Spa, Mt Panorama.
Car(s) Currently Owned: Audi SQ5 3.0L V6 TwinTurbo
Location: Just moved 3 klms further away so now 11 klms from Albert Park, Melbourne.

#12

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

Thanks Sandy.... will sign up and get the job done. Thanks for the info. :thumbsup:

* I started life with nothing, and still have most of it left


“Good drivers have dead flies on the side windows!” (Walter Röhrl)

* I married Miss Right. Just didn't know her first name was Always
User avatar
Everso Biggyballies
Legendary Member
Legendary Member
Posts: 48390
Joined: 18 years ago
Real Name: Chris
Favourite Motorsport: Anything that goes left and right.
Favourite Racing Car: Too Many to mention
Favourite Driver: Kimi,Niki,Jim(none called Michael)
Favourite Circuit: Nordschleife, Spa, Mt Panorama.
Car(s) Currently Owned: Audi SQ5 3.0L V6 TwinTurbo
Location: Just moved 3 klms further away so now 11 klms from Albert Park, Melbourne.

#13

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

SBan83 wrote: 1 month ago
Everso Biggyballies wrote: 1 month ago
SBan83 wrote: 1 month ago @Everso Biggyballies : It's there on R4E and also on all major torrent sites.
I entered it (Race for Glory) in the search on R4Me and got only something from 1989 and another a NASCAR thing.
I did a google search for a torrent and got one that set my antivirus off and unsafe site warnings. :suspicious:
Oh, R4E is Racing for Everyone. It's an alternative to RfM that's open to everyone without needing an invite.
Dangit..... Went to sign up and as soon as I clicked the signup button to add my details I got a popup...... "Open Registration is Closed - you need an invite!" :tearful: :sick:
Thanks anyway.

* I started life with nothing, and still have most of it left


“Good drivers have dead flies on the side windows!” (Walter Röhrl)

* I married Miss Right. Just didn't know her first name was Always
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SBan83
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Posts: 3665
Joined: 20 years ago

#14

Post by SBan83 »

Everso Biggyballies wrote: 1 month ago
SBan83 wrote: 1 month ago
Everso Biggyballies wrote: 1 month ago
SBan83 wrote: 1 month ago @Everso Biggyballies : It's there on R4E and also on all major torrent sites.
I entered it (Race for Glory) in the search on R4Me and got only something from 1989 and another a NASCAR thing.
I did a google search for a torrent and got one that set my antivirus off and unsafe site warnings. :suspicious:
Oh, R4E is Racing for Everyone. It's an alternative to RfM that's open to everyone without needing an invite.
Dangit..... Went to sign up and as soon as I clicked the signup button to add my details I got a popup...... "Open Registration is Closed - you need an invite!" :tearful: :sick:
Thanks anyway.
Damn, not sure when they went invite-only. Tried checking to see if I had any invites to share, but nope. :dunno:
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SBan83
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#15

Post by SBan83 »

Here you go @Everso Biggyballies
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