F1 2026 STUFF NOT WORTHY OF IT'S OWN THREAD

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2026 New Chassis Regs... **Smaller, lighter and more nimble cars targetted**

#1

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

2026 New Chassis Regs...F1 targeting smaller cars for 2026 **New 2024 F2 wing a clue to F1 direction**

Early days yet but thankfully on the agenda for the new look 2026 is going to please many here who have complained about the huge increase of the dimensions of F1 cars over the years to the point of the ridiculous size of todays cars.

Of course the one thing I notice is the fact they are only 'targeting reduced dimensions.... actually achieving that is not yet confirmed as we have yet to see any firm ideas beyond what the engines might be. However the fact that engines are likely to have their bulk trimmed substantially with less addon bits is at least an indicator that size reduction of cars will be a genuine chance.

ANyway as it is obviously going to be a long process with many proposals and counter proposals I thought a thread to cover the ongoing size projections of cars exclusively will save confusion of different bits of news being addd to different existing threads. At least with a dedicated to the new bodywork regs will keep it all in one place for easier ongoing discussion and reference.

We have in the past shown pics showing the changes of car size over the decades.

This one I have dug out shows only how Ferrari have grown over the years, but all manus have almost identical growth patterns, be it for containing all the componentry through to increased use of safety cells and crash structures through to the increase in size for aero benefit.

Image


F1 targeting smaller cars for 2026
Formula 1 could see a return to smaller cars in the mid-term future, per goals outlined in relation to the world championship’s next generation of power units.

F1 introduced revolutionary new technical regulations this season, with a shift to ground effects having proven a hit in facilitating closer racing.

On the horizon is the next wave of power units, which are due to debut in 2026.

Four pillars had already been announced for the 2026 power unit, namely: maintaining the spectacle, environmental sustainability (including up to 50 percent electrical power and using 100 percent sustainable fuel), financial sustainability, and being attractive to new manufacturers.

Porsche and Audi have been linked to joining F1 at that point in time.

A meeting of the FIA Formula 1 Commission in London has now outlined a further six targets with regards to updating related aerodynamic regulations following simulation work.

Significantly reduced drag to improve sustainability and efficiency and complement the Power Unit characteristics.
Maintain and improve on recent lessons learned about close racing and cars being able to follow each other.
Reduce car dimensions.
Reduce or contain car mass.
Sustainability: Continue path towards the standardisation or simplification of strategically-selected components for cost-cutting purposes. Expand the usage of sustainable materials or technologies and focus on recyclability.
Continued innovation in terms of car safety, moving towards active and connected safety systems.
The third and fourth points are of particular note, given that F1 cars have become significantly larger and heavier over the years.

Changes to the power unit could facilitate a shorter, more petite car.

A freeze on engine development is now in place until the end of 2025, ensuring that manufacturers aren’t running parallel programmes.

Other outcomes out of the second Commission meeting of the year include a trial of reducing tyre allocations at two grands prix in 2023.
https://www.speedcafe.com/2022/04/27/f1 ... -for-2026/
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#2

Post by XcraigX »

This is welcome news. But to really achieve this they need to eliminate some of the multiple power redundancies (MGU-H, MGU-K, turbos, etc). Naturally aspirated with electric sources or turbo with no electrics. Heck even hydrogen fuel ICEs without the electrics would be decent (but the hydrogen storage would still need a larger tank compared to today).
Or they could reverse the rules and bring back some sort of refueling (swapping power cells or topping up some sort of fluid).
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#3

Post by Vassago »

Said this few years ago, the modern F1 cars are too heavy and the power-to-weight ratio is the main reason the racing is mediocre. The hybrid engines are obviously much heavier than the old fashioned petrol ones and maybe FIA has finally seen the light instead of trying to convince everyone the track layouts are to blame. They are not, it's the technical formula to begin with.
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#4

Post by MonteCristo »

Looking at how skinny the cars are around their rear packaging, there is surely some room to smoosh them together and save a foot or so.
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#5

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

MonteCristo wrote: 1 year ago Looking at how skinny the cars are around their rear packaging, there is surely some room to smoosh them together and save a foot or so.
All the extra safety cells, deformable crash structures, legs cant be less than x feet from the scene of the crash point, not to mention the central position of a no refuelling size fuel tank are as much to blame as all the hybrid gizmo and technology, batteries etc.
Also I have a feeling the designers quite like the size of the cars for the larger floor area to generate all the downforce and also make the diffuser more effective. (I dont know that last bit for fact but STR reading something along those lines.)

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#6

Post by Star »

This might be a simplistic view, but wouldn't a smaller car be a faster car? I know the weight plays an important part in it too, but on the whole surely it works that way doesn't it?

Having seen that graphic they have grown a lot over the years. You don't notice it much year on year, but when you see them all like that you really do see it.
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#7

Post by erwin greven »

The hybrid systems and the no-refueling rule made the F1 car that big.
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#8

Post by Michkov »

MonteCristo wrote: 1 year ago Looking at how skinny the cars are around their rear packaging, there is surely some room to smoosh them together and save a foot or so.
But think of all that downforce the large underbody creates. :D

As far as I'm concerned F1 cars should have 300kgs, most of which is driver and safety cell. Let the teams figure out how to get there. Would help with efficiency too, having to lug less weight around.
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#9

Post by Kai-Star »

Good idea. Hope they can achieve it.
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#10

Post by PTRACER »

Vassago wrote: 1 year ago Said this few years ago, the modern F1 cars are too heavy and the power-to-weight ratio is the main reason the racing is mediocre. The hybrid engines are obviously much heavier than the old fashioned petrol ones and maybe FIA has finally seen the light instead of trying to convince everyone the track layouts are to blame. They are not, it's the technical formula to begin with.
Agreed, they are not very nimble, particularly in the opening laps. Though they don't seem much better on low fuel and on soft tyres during the sprint races.

Btw reducing the size of the cars would significantly reduce the aero/drag/dirty air as well.
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#11

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

This is probably as relevant in this thread as anywhere. In fact it does not reflect to something that is planned for the F1 2026 aero directly at this stage. My concerns and mentioning it is that what has been launched is the new for 2024 F2 rear wing, and talk is that F1 will mandate a similar type of rear wing for 2026

Given the new 2026 bodywork regs have indicated a move to less drag than current this particular wing seems all about increasing DRS effect. As I say this id F2's answer but thetalk i F1 is on the same track. In effect it seems the lowering of drag on cars means that DRS as is will be less efficient so as this shows the DRS increases will need to be grater to offer meaningful effect, given a low drag start point.

Basically the wing is half size but the DRS flap is much larger. :suspicious:

Oh and did I say it looks butt ugly..... :nuts: :suspicious:
F2's radical rear wing idea could offer clue to F1's future DRS route

Image

The radical design, which fans out high in the air like the feathers of a peacock, prompted a great deal of close-up focus from onlookers, including several F1 team principals.

But rather than it being the result of some wild idea by F2's design chiefs for the car to look fancy, instead it has been created that way for a specific reason: to help the racing.

As F2 boss Bruno Michel said: "The rear wing itself has a round shape that is quite close to what F1 is having at the moment.

"The big difference is probably what you saw, which is the flap that is quite heavy and big. That's really been done to make sure that, with the kind of set-up that we have at the car, we can have extremely strong DRS efficiency."

The specific push to increase the DRS delta – the top speed difference between the rear wing flap being opened and closed – is interesting because it has been a topic of concern for F1 ahead of the new 2026 regulations.

As F1 moves towards a more active aero, aimed at reducing drag on the straights to counter the loss of power from the new power units, there have been worries that overtaking will be much harder.

If all cars have less drag, then that will reduce the potential DRS delta, and make passing on the straights so much harder. That could be alleviated if a bigger top DRS flap, like the F2 car has, is mandated.

F1 is also making an intense effort to try to get rid of DRS trains, which are the consequence of the delta not being big enough to allow pursuing cars to get past.

Image
2024 F2 rear wing


As F1 chief technical officer Pat Symonds told Motorsport.com recently: "One of the objectives, and what we're trying to do in 2026, is to get rid of the DRS train.

"At the moment, we're talking about a car that has four aerodynamic states. I don't think we'll end up with four aerodynamic states, we will end up with two or possibly three.

"But while some of that will be through technical regulations, some of that will be through sporting regulations as well."

As work continues on framing the final 2026 F1 chassis regulations, the lessons learned from what happens with the F2 idea will almost certainly be taken on board, and could therefore influence what happens in F1.

Michel says that F2's previous moves to lead innovation, such as with 18-inch tyres and fully sustainable fuels, will continue.

"F2 has been pioneering for a few things for F1 in the past," he explained. "And we'll continue to do it.

"It started with 18-inch tyres before F1, and it helped Pirelli quite a lot in their development. F2 is working with sustainable fuel already now. And I think there are a lot of things that we can put in place in F2, and that will be implemented in F1 later on."

FIA deputy president of sport Robert Reid concurred that the range of ideas being pursued in F2, from safety to car dimensions to aero, were important for helping learnings in other categories, including F1.

Image


"We're learning in all different directions all the time," he said when asked by Motorsport.com about the potential for F2's DRS lessons to flow in to grand prix racing.

"We have a car here that meets the F1 standards, and all this data that we gather goes into one pot.

"Within the FIA, we have a single seater department: we don't have an F1 team, and then the rest of the pyramid. So it's the same guys, like Tim Goss, in terms of technical side, that are working on the whole pyramid.

"And that consistency, whether that be steering weight, or more adjustable cockpit size, or safety, is really important to us to have over that whole pyramid."
https://www.motorsport.com/fia-f2/news/ ... /10513842/

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#12

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

FIA formalises ban on 2026 F1 aero testing

The Headmaster has spoken.....The FIA has formally confirmed the ban on Formula 1 aerodynamic testing for 2026 via changes to the sporting regulations. It suggests they are trying to stop teams starting early on their new regs clean sheet of paper crs and engines... in effect they cannot use aero means to identify areas/ initiatives to either avoid or progress. I guess they are worried some teams will divert all their 2024 resources into the 2025 cars and not continue to evolve their current cars. It might be seen as perhaps not very Audi friendly, who would no doubt already have p[eople working on their mount for the 2026 debut as a brand. Likewise any 'other' new teams like the potential still to be confirmed Andretti effort.

What does it mean in terms of the rulebook?
Teams are not allowed to undertake any wind tunnel or CFD work for the new spec cars until January 1 2025, mirroring a similar arrangement that was made ahead of the last big rules change in 2022.

The future technical regulations have not been finalised, but teams already have a good understanding of what direction will be taken.

Unusually the 2023 sporting regulations have been changed after the end of the actual World Championship in order to impose the 2026 ATR ban from December 1 to 31, while the same amendments have been made to the 2024 rules.
https://www.motorsport.com/f1/news/fia- ... /10555905/
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#13

Post by Michael Ferner »

Are you trying to make a point by repeating what you've just said, or is it just a 'fashion statement'?

Are you trying to make a point by repeating what you've just said, or is it just a 'fashion statement'?
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#14

Post by Everso Biggyballies »

Michael Ferner wrote: 2 months ago Are you trying to make a point by repeating what you've just said, or is it just a 'fashion statement'?

Are you trying to make a point by repeating what you've just said, or is it just a 'fashion statement'?
Whoops.... I trimmed the actual much longer article down to make it less arduous having first quoted the whole article. I must have picked the bits I wanted to kep, copied them and forgotten to delete what I had left myself.

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#15

Post by Michael Ferner »

Mmmhh, kangaroo mince, yummy!

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